randi2204: Seven together riding off into the sunrise (GotC) (mag7 - silhouette seven purple and gold)
[personal profile] randi2204
It’s that time again – Say What? is back!  Today we’ll be taking a look at a couple of sayings that give some insight into both hope and reality.  Let’s get right into better to light a candle than to curse the darkness and man’s reach exceeds his grasp, and we’ll be enlisting the characters from the Magnificent Seven movie to help.

Reach for the candle but don’t grasp the flame. )
randi2204: (sven)
[personal profile] randi2204
For today’s edition of [community profile] fandom_grammar, we have a pair of words that are quite commonly confused, particularly in scenes where you definitely wouldn’t want them to be confused.  Let’s tackle shutter and shudder, with some help from the characters of Voltron.

I shudder to think of closing the shutters. )
green_grrl: (SPN_JAhee)
[personal profile] green_grrl
I, N, and G say that E and D have been known to take action in the past

A Tense Situation by John Atkinson

I can't resist a little verb-al humor. (Personally, I think E and D should be a little more worried about I, N, and G, as they like to be in the middle of the action, right now!)

See Fandom Grammar's parts of speech: verbs: tense tag to learn more about these rascals.
chomiji: Tenpou from Saiyuki Gaiden. with the caption Not necessarily by the book (Tenpou - Not by the book)
[personal profile] chomiji

Today's set of easily confused words is as mellifluous as it is puzzling. We'll try to clarify the situation with the help of the Knight of Lost Words, October ("Toby") Daye, and her friends.

All right, let's go! )
ariestess: (autumn leaves -- from dhamphir)
[personal profile] ariestess
Welcome to another round of Commonly Confused Words. I'm your host, AJ, and today we'll be unraveling the differences between weary, wary, and worry, with the help of our friends from Once Upon a Time and Damien, as well as Dictionary.com.

weary vs. wary vs. worry )
ariestess: (tyrol cylon -- from beeej)
[personal profile] ariestess

Source


Grant Snider over at Incidental Comics offers up a slew of new proofreader's marks for consideration. I happen to be down with all of them, especially the cyclopsis, horribly wrong font, and word tornado options.

What are your favorites, either from this list or from the established marks we already have? Do you have any new ones you'd nominate?

And for those of you interested in this topic, feel free to check our past forays into proofreader's marks in this Feature, this Friday Funnies, and this Friday Funnies.
whymzycal: Demon-shaped steam rising from tea (tea demon)
[personal profile] whymzycal
Happy Monday, grammar friends, and welcome to our next look at a pair of Commonly Confused Words!

Today we’re going to look at decent and descent, two words that are often mistaken for one another because their spellings are so similar. With examples from the Avengers and Star Trek. )
melayneseahawk: (meaning of life)
[personal profile] melayneseahawk
Hello, and welcome to another article on Commonly Confused Words! Today’s topic is a pair of words that I confuse all the time, so I thought I’d settle it once and for all: what is the difference between “appraise” and “apprise”, and what are some ways to remember which is which?

First, let’s start with some definitions...

appraise/apprise, with examples from Steven Universe and Star Trek (2009) )

Tune in next week for another set of Commonly Confused Words!

(The Star Trek example is shamelessly borrowed from Deastar’s marvelous So Wise We Grow.)
whymzycal: Text saying proper use of their, there, and they're makes me hot (their there etc)
[personal profile] whymzycal

Hover text: later still: wait, HOW DID UTAHRAPTOR KNOW?


Malapropisms (replacing one word with an incorrect, similar-sounding word, usually in a way that ends up being funny) and mondegreens (sort of like malapropisms, except you mis-hear a word instead of saying the wrong word) are something many of the grammarians see and hear at their jobs. That said, thanks to Ryan North at Dinosaur Comics,I doubt anyone can do them as well as T-Rex.

So, do you have any favorite malapropisms or mondegreens? Mine is “from the gecko” (instead of “from the get-go”). I keep imagining the Geico insurance company’s spokeslizard—or maybe even a tiny, tiny T-Rex. Adorable!
green_grrl: (SG1_JDWhat)
[personal profile] green_grrl
Two characters have sexily stripped off their tops. One is gently laying a line of kisses down the other from neck to … er … is it naval or navel? Using the wrong one is going to generate some confusing mental images.

Let’s look at these two words with some help from the Avengers. )
mab_browne: (Hannibal)
[personal profile] mab_browne
Welcome to this Fandom Grammar post on commonly confused words. We have a list of four for you today: alley; ally; allay; and alloy. Our fannish examples will come from NBC Hannibal. May I allay any potential concerns with a promise of no scary or gory references?
Allies and alleys – not the same thing )
chiroho: (android logo blue)
[personal profile] chiroho


While many of us were taught in school, at least those of us of a certain age, that a sentence should never be ended with a preposition, that's probably a philosophy that has carried over from Latin grammar and isn't really suited for modern English usage. There are certainly times when you shouldn't use a preposition at the end of a sentence, for example when the preposition is extraneous, but Oxford Dictionaries has a nice little blog that includes a primer on prepositions and how they can be used that should help you avoid mistakes.

Of course, in the specific example used in the cartoon above, I think I'd be convicting the defendant as well. :-)
randi2204: (avengers - A is for)
[personal profile] randi2204
Hello, and welcome back to [community profile] fandom_grammar!  We’re in our new digs on Dreamwidth—mind the fresh paint!—and ready to answer your grammar questions.  Today we’ll ease back in to a regular posting schedule, starting off with a couple of commonly confused words that have similar spellings but very different meanings.  Let’s take a look at alter and altar, with some help from the Avengers.

How can we alter that altar? )
[identity profile] melayneseahawk.livejournal.com
We hope everyone is having a good start to their new year! Fandom Grammar will be turning TEN this fall, so keep an eye out for some fresh ideas coming later this year!
Tags:
ariestess: (grammar -- from cmzero)
[personal profile] ariestess

Source: Bizarro


My first thought on reading this is that the "real" should actually be "really", but that's probably just me being pendantic.

But this comic brings home the point of proper comma usage, too. If I was that bully, I'd probably punch the well-digger in the nose for calling me "Stupid."

So how would you rewrite this comic to be more grammatically correct?
[identity profile] chiroho.livejournal.com


"* Mad about jorts"


When I showed this comic to the other fandom grammarians they loved it. Have you seen something similar? Does the person who is the first to criticize someone wearing white after Labor Day behave in the same way as the person who goes ballistic at the inappropriate usage of an apostrophe? Then perhaps you're seeing the same correlation that Randall Munroe of XKCD does.
[identity profile] whymzycal.livejournal.com
Happy Monday, and welcome to the next installment of Say What?, in which we discover the origins of (Don’t) upset the applecart and The apple never falls far from the tree. With examples from Supernatural )
[identity profile] mab-browne.livejournal.com
Today's question is about whether or not the word series is singular or plural. Because the English language can be a touch on the unexpected side, the answer to that is that it's both.
Read more under the cut )
[identity profile] http://users.livejournal.com/traycer_/
This week we are going to focus on the proper use of hear, hear vs here, here. And we're going to have help from the Stargate SG-1 crew.

Read more... )
[identity profile] achacunsagloire.livejournal.com
It’s Monday again, dear Fandom Grammar readers!  Considering this particular day of the week means trading leisure for work (or schoolwork) for the next five days, it’s easy to feel gloomy on Mondays and gawk at the long wait until Friday.  But today we’re going to focus on the positive instead of the negative, like our two idioms of the day suggest: “The darkest hour is just before the dawn” and “every cloud has a silver lining.”  To better shine the light on these two Positive-Polly phrases, we’ll get some help from the characters of Silent Hill, who are experts at finding their way in the dark.

Click on this cut for illumination on these two idioms. )

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