ariestess: (harbor seal -- from meathiel)
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For this week's Say What? adventure, we're going to look at a couple of seemingly biblically-inspired sayings, with the help of our friends over at with the help of our friends over at Once Upon a Time )
ariestess: (TFO beauty -- from theonlyspl)
[personal profile] ariestess
Today we're going to look at this anonymously asked question, "Do appositives always need punctuation?" with the help of our friends from Ghostbusters.

Do appositives always need punctuation? )
ariestess: (autumn leaves -- from dhamphir)
[personal profile] ariestess
Welcome to another round of Commonly Confused Words. I'm your host, AJ, and today we'll be unraveling the differences between weary, wary, and worry, with the help of our friends from Once Upon a Time and Damien, as well as Dictionary.com.

weary vs. wary vs. worry )
ariestess: (tyrol cylon -- from beeej)
[personal profile] ariestess

Source


Grant Snider over at Incidental Comics offers up a slew of new proofreader's marks for consideration. I happen to be down with all of them, especially the cyclopsis, horribly wrong font, and word tornado options.

What are your favorites, either from this list or from the established marks we already have? Do you have any new ones you'd nominate?

And for those of you interested in this topic, feel free to check our past forays into proofreader's marks in this Feature, this Friday Funnies, and this Friday Funnies.
ariestess: (grammar -- from cmzero)
[personal profile] ariestess

Source: Bizarro


My first thought on reading this is that the "real" should actually be "really", but that's probably just me being pendantic.

But this comic brings home the point of proper comma usage, too. If I was that bully, I'd probably punch the well-digger in the nose for calling me "Stupid."

So how would you rewrite this comic to be more grammatically correct?
ariestess: (grammar use it -- from shoegal_icons)
[personal profile] ariestess
Welcome to another installment of the Friday Funnies! Just on a Monday!

{Bonus points to anyone who gets that reference.}


Cyanide & Happiness (Explosm.net)


Even when I hear things like this being said in Westerns or by "hillbillies", it still makes my skin crawl. But I'd be a hypocrite if I said I've never used a double negative before. My prime transgression? "Ain't nobody got no time for that."

So what's your favorite double negative to say?
ariestess: (grammar -- from cmzero)
[personal profile] ariestess
Welcome to another installment of Blast From the Past. This week we're going to look at a couple more sets of easily confused words: it's/its and your/you're. [livejournal.com profile] melayneseahawk first covered them back in 2008, and then [livejournal.com profile] chiroho tackled them in a 2011 BftP. So let's give both of these easily confused duos another glance with a little help from our friends over at Once Upon a Time, shall we?

Blast from the past: it's/its and your/you're )
ariestess: (regina apple -- from miz_tith)
[personal profile] ariestess

original image via Mother Goose and Grimm/Mike Peters Website


So let me start off this week's Friday Funny with an item of note. As far as I know, there has never been an instance of two Friday Funny posts in a row about the exact same error. This wasn't done on purpose, but it certainly shows that this is an error that comes up a lot. In fact, last week's comic brought up some interesting discussions regarding how and when to correct someone else's grammar faux pas. I'm not sure that's something that can easily be determined in a "blanket statement" kind of way, outside of the old cliche of knowing your audience.

That said, this is one of those misheard/misused phrases that actually irks me a lot. And when I've tried to explain it to people in the past, they get mad at me for "ruining the spirit of the moment".

In a nutshell, it's a matter of degrees, and it reminds me of the saying, "I have no f*cks to give." If you really don't have an iota of care about the situation, the correct phrase is "couldn't care less", but if there's even a smidgeon of care, then you can use "could care less". Plus, I tend to use the former if I'm just too bored to care at that particular moment in time.
ariestess: (beta-whore -- from ctorres)
[personal profile] ariestess
Welcome to this week's installment of Blast From the Past! This week, we've got a two-fer of commonly confused words for you: their/there/they're and to/too/two. Both were orignally covered in January 2008 by [livejournal.com profile] green_grrl, then both got individual focus in their own BftP: the former in November 2011 by [livejournal.com profile] chiroho and the latter in October 2011 by [livejournal.com profile] supercheesegirl. So let's see if we can get a brief refresher on these two homophone triads with a little help from our friends over at Witches of East End.


Blast from the past: their/there/they're and to/too/two )
ariestess: (regina apple -- from miz_tith)
[personal profile] ariestess
Today's installment of "Say What?" will look at two phrases that have a common basis in Christianity and taking responsibility for your misdeeds. You've probably heard both but may not know what they mean. So let's find out together with the help of our friends over at Once Upon a Time, shall we?

(Don't) rob Peter to pay Paul. / (The) writing on the wall. )
ariestess: (beta-whore -- from ctorres)
[personal profile] ariestess
It's that time again! "What time is that?" you say? Why, for a Friday editorial, my dear fellow grammarians! This week, we'll take a look at "Top 10 Errors in English that Aren't Errors", which was published on Listverse on April 3, 2008.

Top 10 Errors in English that Aren't Errors )
ariestess: (adama's sweater monkeys)
[personal profile] ariestess
Welcome to another Friday editorial, fellow grammarians! This week we're going to take a look at James Harbeck's article Hey, grammar nerds! Stop freaking out about 'alot.' from July 17, 2014.

a lot vs. alot )
ariestess: (grammar -- from cmzero)
[personal profile] ariestess
Hello again, fellow grammarians! Today we're going to tackle the question "Is adjective order important?" with the generous help of our friends over at Once Upon a Time.

Is adjective order important? )
ariestess: (beta-whore -- from ctorres)
[personal profile] ariestess
Good afternoon, fellow grammarians! Today we're going to answer the question, When do you use "like" versus "as"?, with a little help from our friends over at Once Upon a Time.

When do you use 'like' versus 'as'? )
ariestess: (grammar use it -- from shoegal_icons)
[personal profile] ariestess
Hello there, fellow grammarians! Today we're going to answer the question, What are "false friends"?, with a little help from our friends over at Captain America: The First Avenger.

What are 'false friends'? )
ariestess: (grammar -- from cmzero)
[personal profile] ariestess

Click to embiggen


Here at [livejournal.com profile] fandom_grammar, we've covered commas several times in the past, so I won't necessarily rehash that information here.

Anyone that knows me knows that I'm a stickler for the Oxford comma. But when I first saw this graphic, I nearly died from laughing so hard. I could picture the pauses with each comma. Of course, it didn't help -- or is that hurt? -- that I could also hear Walken's and Shatner's voices in my head as I was reading their panels.

I suppose this graphic, while hilarious, just illustrates the point of choosing your comma style and being consistent in its usage.
ariestess: (beta-whore -- from ctorres)
[personal profile] ariestess
Getting words wrong is like a rite of passage when you're first learning to speak a language, regardless of whether you're a child with your mother tongue or an adult learning a second language. You learn from your mistakes and grow more proficient in the language. In "25 Common Words That You've Got Wrong", Joseph Hindy discusses twenty-five commonly used words that he claims aren't being used correctly. Or maybe it's better to say that they're not being used to their original meanings, as he describes the popular meaning of some words as an error next to the "correct" original, and sometimes archaic, meaning for each word. Hindy explains how he believes the errors may have come about, as well as how to fix them, in a conversational, non-accusatory tone. That he also attempts to connect with his readers by admitting to misusing some of these words only makes the article more relatable.

More about those 25 commonly incorrect words... )
ariestess: (grammar -- from cmzero)
[personal profile] ariestess
Hello again, fellow grammarians! Today we're going to answer the question, When do you use "everyday" versus "every day"?, with a little help from our friends over at Once Upon a Time.

Everyday vs. Every Day )
ariestess: (regina apple -- from miz_tith)
[personal profile] ariestess


I may not be an English teacher, but I'm mentally doing this exact same thing more often than I care to admit. LOL!

If you had the opportunity to do something like this, would you? What if there were absolutely no consequences involved at all?
ariestess: (regina apple -- from miz_tith)
[personal profile] ariestess
Welcome to this week's installment of Blast From the Past! When last we delved into the "tenet vs. tenant" debate, it was November 2013 with [livejournal.com profile] green_grrl. So let's give this oldie but goodie another glance, with the help of our friends over at Once Upon a Time.

On the surface, both words sound and even look alike. That both come from the same Latin word, tenēre, meaning "to hold" doesn't help in determining proper usage of either. So what are the differences between these two words?

tenet vs. tenant )

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