randi2204: (guitar gods)
[personal profile] randi2204
Welcome back, grammar fans! [community profile] fandom_grammar has a lighter schedule during these summer months, but fear not, we still have interesting grammar issues to discuss!  Today we’ll be talking about a couple of words that are very commonly used in place of each other.  Ground and floor aren’t exactly the same thing, and we’ll get into their differences with some help from the characters of Sherlock.

Are you sure you don’t mean the ground floor? )
whymzycal: night drips in through a window (night floods in)
[personal profile] whymzycal
Happy Monday, grammar fans, and welcome to today’s post, in which we answer the question, “Is it ‘drips and drabs’ or ‘dribs and drabs’?” with a little help from the characters of Sherlock )
traycer: (Default)
[personal profile] traycer
[livejournal.com profile] minesomine asks: When do you use "off" versus "of", and how do you remember the difference?

With examples from The Dresden Files

Off vs Of - Moving onward... )

Answer: Moot

Monday, 22 May 2017 16:31
randi2204: McCoy with all the things he says he's not in TOS (star trek - mccoy is not your)
[personal profile] randi2204
We were asked, What is the origin and correct usage of “moot?” Moot has a variety of meanings, so correct usage can be a bit tricky.  Let’s dig right in with some help from the characters of Star Trek.

Who gives a hoot about moot? )
ariestess: (TFO beauty -- from theonlyspl)
[personal profile] ariestess
Today we're going to look at this anonymously asked question, "Do appositives always need punctuation?" with the help of our friends from Ghostbusters.

Do appositives always need punctuation? )
green_grrl: (SG1_JDWhat)
[personal profile] green_grrl
English is full of phrases that get sprinkled through conversation. We pick them up, use them, and don't think too hard about them until we have to write them down. Then we realize we're not quite sure what the exact phrase is. [personal profile] lauramcewan asked us about one of these: "Is it 'one and the same' or 'one in the same'?" When spoken, the phrase tends to sound like "one 'n' the same," so it is understandably confusing.

Unlike some other usage questions, there is only one right answer here. I'll illustrate with the Avengers. )
whymzycal: sequin stars (stars)
[personal profile] whymzycal
Hello, fellow grammar fans! Today we’re going to explore the question posed by [personal profile] wanted_a_pony: “When do you use ‘you and I’ versus ‘you and me’? Are there differences in American and British English?”

Let’s find out the answer with a little help from the characters of Harry Potter and Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them. )
randi2204: (sven)
[personal profile] randi2204
For today’s edition of [community profile] fandom_grammar, we have a pair of words that are quite commonly confused, particularly in scenes where you definitely wouldn’t want them to be confused.  Let’s tackle shutter and shudder, with some help from the characters of Voltron.

I shudder to think of closing the shutters. )
chomiji: Tenpou from Saiyuki Gaiden. with the caption Not necessarily by the book (Tenpou - Not by the book)
[personal profile] chomiji

Today's set of easily confused words is as mellifluous as it is puzzling. We'll try to clarify the situation with the help of the Knight of Lost Words, October ("Toby") Daye, and her friends.

All right, let's go! )
ariestess: (autumn leaves -- from dhamphir)
[personal profile] ariestess
Welcome to another round of Commonly Confused Words. I'm your host, AJ, and today we'll be unraveling the differences between weary, wary, and worry, with the help of our friends from Once Upon a Time and Damien, as well as Dictionary.com.

weary vs. wary vs. worry )
[identity profile] achacunsagloire.livejournal.com
Happy Halloween, dear Fandom Grammar readers!  Since we find ourselves once again on that most famous Day of Ghouls and Fright, it is only fitting that we examine two very terrible, very different, but often mistaken words whose definitions are no less insidious for the error: envy and jealousy.  Such a daunting challenge requires the assistance of those who have experience investigating humankind’s inner malice.  So, aiding us in our investigation of these two “evils within” will be Detective Sebastian Castellanos and the other characters from The Evil Within.

This won’t hurt—too much. Let’s get started, shall we? )
[identity profile] green-grrl.livejournal.com
One of our readers asks, “How many exclamation marks are too many? What is the standard usage on number of exclamation marks in a sentence or on a page?”

This sounds like a question born in the era of OMG!!!!!1!!1eleventy!, but questions around overuse of exclamation marks—or exclamation points in American English—have been around for much longer. Here is some advice, old and new, with examples from Stargate SG-1. )
[identity profile] chiroho.livejournal.com
Welcome to your first post-hiatus post from Fandom Grammar. As I hope you saw a couple of days ago, the community is back to a weekly posting schedule, and we're expanding our communications beyond LiveJournal to other social media. If you have questions, please submit them as comments to this post, as we'd love to start answering them again.

This week I'll be looking at the origin of the word rigmarole, and what it means today.

John and Harold, from Person of Interest, will go through the rigmarole of finding an answer. )
[identity profile] green-grrl.livejournal.com
Our question today is from [livejournal.com profile] ely_baby, who wants to know: When writing mostly in the present tense, what tense should be used for events in the past? 

There are a lot of past tense choices, and all of them can work with a present tense narrative. I will use Daisy, from Agents of SHIELD, to illustrate the options with some present day action and past history. )
randi2204: EVIL! (dawn - the slayer)
[personal profile] randi2204
Welcome to your Monday, fellow grammarians!  Today we’ll be looking at a thorny little question about some words (or possible words) that are all spelled very similarly and sound alike when spoken.  [livejournal.com profile] lanalucy asked us “What is the difference between ‘a lot’ and ‘allot’? Is ‘alot’ a word?”  Let’s dig right into this with some help from our friends in Buffy the Vampire Slayer.

There are a lot of lots to allot.  )
[identity profile] chiroho.livejournal.com
This week's commonly confused words will include three homonyms, censor, censer, and sensor, as well as censure, which has a slightly different pronunciation but is often confused with them. The examples will be using our friends at Person of Interest.

I need a sensor for the censer before the censor censures me )
[identity profile] green-grrl.livejournal.com
Our question today is when to use hoard versus horde. Both words have to do with a mass quantity, so they are often used interchangeably. But this is an error, as they do have separate, distinct meanings. Here's how to know when to use which, with examples using characters from The Hobbit. )
randi2204: (mag7 - buck twinkly)
[personal profile] randi2204
Today we’ll be discussing a couple of words that are pronounced the same way but have very different meanings. Let’s take a look at taught and taut, and a side order of taunt, with some help from the folks in the Magnificent Seven.

Teaching stretches me so thin. )
[identity profile] bluewolf458.livejournal.com
It's amazing how many homonyms (aka homophones) there are in English - and probably other languages too, but English is the one that concerns us. Let's see if our friends from The Sentinel can give us a little help to distinguish between aisle and isle. Read more... )

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